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  • Heavy rains on Wednesday 28 August in Bamako left 37 deaths and about 20,000 people displaced. 

IOM is continuing to support the Malian Government in responding to the emergency caused by  floods that hit the capital Bamako on the 28th of August. It is reported that the floods left 37 dead and affected some 2,133 families or 20,000 people. As part of the response, IOM has already handed over 500 non-food (NFI) relief kits containing sleeping mats, blankets, mosquito nets and kitchen supplies to the Malian Government to help the worst affected families. © IOM 2013 (Photo by Fabrice Recalt) - MML0010Heavy rains on Wednesday 28 August in Bamako left 37 deaths and about 20,000 people displaced. 

IOM is continuing to support the Malian Government in responding to the emergency caused by  floods that hit the capital Bamako on the 28th of August. It is reported that the floods left 37 dead and affected some 2,133 families or 20,000 people. As part of the response, IOM has already handed over 500 non-food (NFI) relief kits containing sleeping mats, blankets, mosquito nets and kitchen supplies to the Malian Government to help the worst affected families. © IOM 2013 (Photo by Fabrice Recalt) - MML0010

    IOM continues flood relief effort

    IOM is continuing to support the Malian Government in responding to the emergency caused by floods that hit the capital Bamako on the 28th of August. It is reported that the floods left 37 dead and affected some 2,133 families or 20,000 people. As part of the response, IOM has already handed over 500 non-food (NFI) relief kits containing sleeping mats, blankets, mosquito nets and kitchen supplies to the Malian Government to help the worst affected families.

  • Locally sourced rice, funded by USAID, being loaded onto the"Indies Trader" for onward transport to Maloelap Atoll, a 16-hour sea voyage away. A severe drought left remote island communities short of essential foodstuff. © IOM/Joe Lowry 2013Locally sourced rice, funded by USAID, being loaded onto the"Indies Trader" for onward transport to Maloelap Atoll, a 16-hour sea voyage away. A severe drought left remote island communities short of essential foodstuff. © IOM/Joe Lowry 2013

    Responding to the Severe Drought in the Marshall I

    The response to a severe drought in the Marshall Islands is entering its second phase, as initial deliveries of emergency food supplies, principally funded by USAID. IOM’s rapidly-established air and sea bridges have delivered an estimated 45 metric tons (100,000 pounds) of food to 677 households on islands over 400 miles (640 km) from Majuro, one of the farthest-flung capitals on the planet.

  • MLK0326

Business as usual. With support from IOM, St Anthony’s Fishermen’s Cooperative, Passaiyoor, is successfully getting back to sea and retaking its rightful place as the life-blood of the community.MLK0326

Business as usual. With support from IOM, St Anthony’s Fishermen’s Cooperative, Passaiyoor, is successfully getting back to sea and retaking its rightful place as the life-blood of the community.

    Working with Sri Lankan Livelihood Support

    IOM works with the government of Sri Lanka and with international governments to help restore stability to the country after 30 years of conflict. The strongest needs are in the North and East of the country, which also suffered most in the tsunami of December 2004. IOM works with communities to provide livelihood support – simply put, getting people back to work so they can feed, clothe and educate their families. Many thousands of Sri Lankans, particularly in the Tamil north, have been displaced several times by conflict. In fact the world’s largest camp for internally displaced people, at Menik Farm, near Vavuniya, closed just last year. Hundreds of thousands of people have returned to their former homes, to a shattered economy and a climate of uncertainty. Against that backdrop IOM runs livelihood, infrastructure and shelter programmes. “It is hugely important for us to continue to fund community development programmes across the island,” stresses Richard Danziger, IOM’s Chief of Mission in Sri Lanka from 2010 to 2013. “Jobs and a sense of self-worth prevent tensions from spilling over. More than that, they keep communities together and prevent the exploitation of would-be migrants. And migrants or failed asylum seekers who are unsuccessful in remaining overseas need to know that there is a chance for them to have another shot at making it work back at home.”

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  • Many Cambodians migrate across the border into Thailand to work as low skilled, undocumented migrants to support their poverty-stricken families. Unemployment, loss of land, food insecurity and debt in their home provinces are the underlying push factors.

While in Thailand, their access to health care is extremely limited and the time many of them spend in crowded immigration detention centres leaves them at risk of Tuberculosis and other health problems. Many undocumented Cambodian migrants are detained and deported from Thailand to the Cambodian border town of Poipet on without any health screening or social support.  

In 2012, through the international TB REACH programme, IOM and the National TB program in Cambodia, established systematic TB screening for arriving migrants. 

About 6,000 returned migrants have been screened so far with 126 detected with TB and over 90 per cent successfully put on treatment and cured. In 2013, IOM is seeking further funding support to continue this active TB case finding, including expanding screening for other communicable diseases, such as HIV and Malaria among migrant mobile populations in border areas.Many Cambodians migrate across the border into Thailand to work as low skilled, undocumented migrants to support their poverty-stricken families. Unemployment, loss of land, food insecurity and debt in their home provinces are the underlying push factors.

While in Thailand, their access to health care is extremely limited and the time many of them spend in crowded immigration detention centres leaves them at risk of Tuberculosis and other health problems. Many undocumented Cambodian migrants are detained and deported from Thailand to the Cambodian border town of Poipet on without any health screening or social support.  

In 2012, through the international TB REACH programme, IOM and the National TB program in Cambodia, established systematic TB screening for arriving migrants. 

About 6,000 returned migrants have been screened so far with 126 detected with TB and over 90 per cent successfully put on treatment and cured. In 2013, IOM is seeking further funding support to continue this active TB case finding, including expanding screening for other communicable diseases, such as HIV and Malaria among migrant mobile populations in border areas.

    Cambodia: Detecting, treating TB in vulnerable migrants 

  • IOM, together with Australia's Agency for International Development (AusAID) and local authorities, is prioritizing the revitalization of fishing infrastructure to restore the livelihoods of people in the region.  Northern Sri Lanka's fishing industry has been crippled by 30 years of conflict and natural disasters.IOM, together with Australia's Agency for International Development (AusAID) and local authorities, is prioritizing the revitalization of fishing infrastructure to restore the livelihoods of people in the region.  Northern Sri Lanka's fishing industry has been crippled by 30 years of conflict and natural disasters.

    Sri Lanka: Bigger Fish to Fry 

  • "Migration for Development in Africa" (MIDA) is a programme that aims at helping African nationals to directly contribute to the development of their countries of origin."Migration for Development in Africa" (MIDA) is a programme that aims at helping African nationals to directly contribute to the development of their countries of origin.

    MIDA working for Ghana and Senegal 

  • Decades of conflict have caused many Afghans to become migrants, and it is often these migrants that are amongst the worst-affected in any crisis. Afghanistan currently has about half a million internally displaced persons (IDPs). Neighbouring Pakistan and Iran alone house about 5.7 million documented and undocumented Afghan migrants. These migrants too often live in compromised socioeconomic situationsDecades of conflict have caused many Afghans to become migrants, and it is often these migrants that are amongst the worst-affected in any crisis. Afghanistan currently has about half a million internally displaced persons (IDPs). Neighbouring Pakistan and Iran alone house about 5.7 million documented and undocumented Afghan migrants. These migrants too often live in compromised socioeconomic situations

    Return of Qualified Afghans 

  • The goal of "Migration for Development in Africa" (MIDA) Great Lakes is to make diaspora expertise available in order to strengthen local capacities in the region.The goal of "Migration for Development in Africa" (MIDA) Great Lakes is to make diaspora expertise available in order to strengthen local capacities in the region.

    MIDA: Make a Move for Africa 

  • A report on the Sixth Combating Human Trafficking Awards Ceremony in Kyiv, Ukraine which recognized the outstanding contributions of individuals, institutions and IOM in the fight against modern-day slavery.A report on the Sixth Combating Human Trafficking Awards Ceremony in Kyiv, Ukraine which recognized the outstanding contributions of individuals, institutions and IOM in the fight against modern-day slavery.

    Fighting against modern-day slavery 

  • IOM Director General‘s Message for the Child Health Now Global Week of ActionIOM Director General‘s Message for the Child Health Now Global Week of Action

    IOM Director General‘s Message 

  • During the civil war in Sudan, over 4 million people fled the south. Since peace was restored, people have returned to South Sudan but hundreds of thousands remain stranded in Sudan with no money or limited transport options which prevent them from going home. In 2012, IOM organized 79 flights over 24 days to return 11,813 people to South Sudan. A transit site was set-up on the outskirts of Juba, the capital of South Sudan, where returnees remained until IOM organized road convoys to their final destination. This short film documents the work of organizations involved with providing assistance to the returnees at the transit site.During the civil war in Sudan, over 4 million people fled the south. Since peace was restored, people have returned to South Sudan but hundreds of thousands remain stranded in Sudan with no money or limited transport options which prevent them from going home. In 2012, IOM organized 79 flights over 24 days to return 11,813 people to South Sudan. A transit site was set-up on the outskirts of Juba, the capital of South Sudan, where returnees remained until IOM organized road convoys to their final destination. This short film documents the work of organizations involved with providing assistance to the returnees at the transit site.

    Return to South Sudan: Assistance in Transit 

  • WeDontCry
This is the story of Ma Lay Lay, the 100,000th refugee departing from camps on the Thailand/Myanmar border for a new life overseas. Leaving her husband behind and traveling with her two tiny children, she leaves the only home she knows, Mae La camp, behind with the hope of finding a better life in the United States.  

IOM, the world leading organization dealing with migration,  facilitates the resettlement process from Thailand by providing medical check-ups, travel orientation and travel assistance.WeDontCry
This is the story of Ma Lay Lay, the 100,000th refugee departing from camps on the Thailand/Myanmar border for a new life overseas. Leaving her husband behind and traveling with her two tiny children, she leaves the only home she knows, Mae La camp, behind with the hope of finding a better life in the United States.  

IOM, the world leading organization dealing with migration,  facilitates the resettlement process from Thailand by providing medical check-ups, travel orientation and travel assistance.

    We Don't Cry 

  • IOM staff prepare for the difficult task of bringing people home safely from the evacuation shelters they fled to on the eve of Tropical Storm Isaac. This Vara Costa video takes you behind the scenes of how IOM staff make field assessments of the storm's damage, deliver relief, and help people return home.IOM staff prepare for the difficult task of bringing people home safely from the evacuation shelters they fled to on the eve of Tropical Storm Isaac. This Vara Costa video takes you behind the scenes of how IOM staff make field assessments of the storm's damage, deliver relief, and help people return home.

    After Isaac, getting everyone home safely 

  • The Australian Cultural Orientation Programme (AUSCO) prepares refugees in Nepal for settlement in Australia through a five-day programme of orientation focusing on travel, on-arrival assistance, and managing cultural, social and economic expectations.The Australian Cultural Orientation Programme (AUSCO) prepares refugees in Nepal for settlement in Australia through a five-day programme of orientation focusing on travel, on-arrival assistance, and managing cultural, social and economic expectations.

    Preparing refugees well before they arrive in Australia 



 

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